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TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT 2017-06-07T16:21:49+00:00

TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

Know Your Hip Joint

The hip region is located lateral to the gluteal region (i.e. the buttock), inferior to the iliac crest, and overlying the greater trochanter of the thigh bone. In adults, three of the bones of the pelvis have fused into the hip bone which forms part of the hip region. The hip joint, scientifically referred to as the acetabulo  femoral joint (art. coxae), is the joint between the femur and acetabulum of the pelvis and its primary function is to support the weight of the body in both static  (e.g. standing) and dynamic (e.g. walking or running) postures.

Indicators of Total Hip Replacement:

Total hip replacement is most commonly used to treat joint failure caused by osteoarthritis. Other indications include rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, traumatic arthritis, protrusio acetabuli, certain hip fractures, benign and malignant bone tumors, arthritis associated with Paget’s disease, ankylosing spondylitis  and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The aims of the procedure are pain relief and improvement in hip function. Hip replacement is usually considered only once other  therapies, such as physical therapy and pain medications, have failed.

Total Hip Replacement

A total hip replacement (THR) is a surgical procedure whereby the diseased cartilage and bone of the hip joint is surgically replaced with artificial materials. The normal hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The socket is a “cup-shaped” bone of the pelvis called the Acetabulum. The ball is the head of the thigh bone (femur). THR involves surgical removal of the diseased ball and socket and replacing them with a metal ball and socket and replacing them with a metal ball and stem inserted into the femur bone and an artificial plastic cup socket. The metallic artificial ball and stem are referred to as the “prosthesis.”  Upon inserting the prosthesis into the central core of the femur, it is fixed with a bony cement called methyl methacrylate. Alternatively, a “cement less” prosthesis is used which has microscopic pores that allow bony ingrowth from the normal femur into the prosthesis stem. This “cement less” hip is felt to have a longer duration and is considered especially for younger patients.